Counseling Services: Helping You Deal with Life

When it comes to professional counseling services, most people tend to fall into a couple categories—those who have experienced it and know how much it helps, and those who are a bit unsure because they’ve never tried it.

Edgewood Clinical Services isn’t your parents’ old-school counseling with the couch as a focus. Instead, we are goal-directed and our distinctive approach to therapy means we seek results—working toward measurable, meaningful goals that make a difference in your life every single day.

We offer a wide range of counseling and therapy services to help you get through the struggles life throws at you. Some of those services include:

Counseling for Individuals

Our therapists and clinicians are committed to getting to know you, to helping you find your strengths, so you can believe in yourself again and rediscover what you can achieve, all in a caring, supportive and non-judgmental environment.

Just as we have our strengths, we all have weaknesses, too. We believe it is important to be honest and clear about what those limitations are, and we will be there to help you accept those as well.

Counseling will help with any problems you are struggling to handle. There are too many to list here, but some of those we can help with include: depression, anxiety, mood instability, substance abuse/overuse, sexuality issues, spiritual issues, parenting guidance, anger and aggression, self-injury/cutting, divorce, eating disorders, loss of a loved one, and coping with job loss or financial hardship.

While it’s natural to want to “fix” a problem, we look at things a bit differently, working instead to help you find a better way to respond to problems you are having. Helping you adapt and getting better results leads to a life that is more satisfying and fulfilling. Something we can all celebrate together!

Counseling for Children and Teenagers

Our first step with children and teenagers is critical—getting to know them and building their trust. Depending on the child and their age, we might begin with playing a game, building something, doing a craft, or just talking. As they become more comfortable, and they know we can be trusted, they will open up and talk about what is bothering them or what struggles they are having.

Building trust isn’t just a buzzword or a philosophy here at Edgewood. It is real and honest. Nothing worthwhile or lasting is achieved without it and our therapists and clinicians take this to heart. It is as much a part of who we are as it is how we work.

A few of the issues we help children and teenagers deal with include depression, anxiety, anger, friendship problems, coping with parent divorce, and bullying.

As with adults, we help children and teens create measurable goals, so they can see real results from their efforts. To help them define these goals, we ask specific questions and their answers are used to gauge their progress.

Additional Counseling Services

We also offer counseling for couples and marriage, anger management, substance abuse, behavior management, and early childhood for those 0-5 years old. Each of these types of counseling helps with a different set of circumstances, but there is a common thread.

Maybe it only starts out as someone to talk to, someone who won’t judge you, but offers you support and the belief in you, that you CAN learn a better way to deal with whatever you struggle with. Maybe you need something more, defined steps to work through.

Whatever you need, we are here for you. Give us a call today and schedule a time to come in. We are looking forward to helping you move forward.

Ask an Edge Expert: December 2018

Grief and Loss: How to Find a Healthy Balance During the Holidays

Featured Expert: Jodi Metcalf, LMFT

Twinkle lights, festive music, cheerful greetings from loved ones and strangers alike…the holiday season is in full swing here at Edgewood, and everywhere you go these days it seems. For many, this is a time of joy, nostalgia, and memory making with friends and family. For some, however, the holiday season can be daunting. Experiencing the loss of a significant person in your life is always painful, but feels especially overwhelming during the holidays. Let’s explore some ways to process and cope with grief in healthy ways.

Let it out

The first and most important thing to remember about grief is that it’s a process. There will be days when you feel fine, and days when you need to cry. When the emotions come, don’t stifle them. If you need to cry, or want to be alone, make it a priority to do so. Grief comes in waves, and can be triggered by seemingly random things. You can’t always plan for it, but you can allow yourself to feel the emotions, and get them out.

Talk about it

Don’t be afraid to share memories of your loved one with your friends and family. Remembering them as they were (good and bad) is a testament to their meaning in your life. Celebrate their impact on your life, laugh at the funny memories, and cry about the sad ones. Write memories down so you can always look back at them through the years. Keep their memory alive by sharing it with others.

Give yourself time

There is no right way to grieve. Every relationship is unique, and every person processes grief in their own way. Don’t give yourself (or let anyone else give you) a timeline. To grieve well is to fully experience the loss of a significant person in your life, in ebbs and flows, as it comes. There will be seasons when grief feels manageable, even distant. There will be seasons when grief feels suffocating. Neither is wrong. Take each day as it comes, and stay present in your thoughts and feelings.

Take breaks

For some of us, guilt comes when we laugh, or feel happy, or have a moment of enjoyment. There is nothing wrong with enjoying your life while also grieving. Balance means just that – finding ways to be joyful in the midst of sadness. You have to be gentle with yourself, and allow yourself to take breaks from the heaviness of grief. Take opportunities to do things you enjoy, and spend time with loved ones.

Honor your loved one

Did your friend or family member love movies? Long walks? Traveling? Find ways (big or small) to honor them by engaging in activities that they enjoyed, or experiences that you did together. Donating to a charity or cause in their name, or helping others who are in need can be a meaningful way to honor the life of your loved one.

Make a memory box

One tangible way to process grief is to create a memory box. This can be done in a variety of ways, but I suggest utilizing a shadow box that can be filled with pictures, notes, special tokens, and memorabilia that create a picture of your loved one’s life. This is a great activity to do as a family (especially with children) to process the loss of a grandparent, beloved pet, or someone special to the family.

Keep living

Survivor’s guilt can be suffocating, and is a very common experience for those who have loss someone important. Especially in the case of sudden and unexpected loss, many people tend to wonder if there was something they could have done to prevent the death. Wondering “what if” is a recipe for disaster. There is nothing to be done about the loss, because the past cannot be changed. The healthiest way to move through this guilt is to value your own life, and live it well. Take that trip you’ve been meaning to go on. Reach out to an old friend who you’ve lost touch with. Set goals, and achieve them. Honor your loved one by experiencing your life to it’s fullest potential.

Seek help

If the loss is debilitating, or you feel that you are crossing over into depression, anxiety, or another clinical issue, reach out for help. Grief and loss is life changing. Many times, the help of a professional is needed to process the loss. There is no shame in this. The burden of grief can be massive, and professional counselors are trained to help guide you through this process with a listening ear and empathetic heart. If you or someone you know is struggling with grief, don’t be afraid to make an appointment with a mental health professional.

 

Should you or someone you know have specific questions or concerns regarding grief, don’t hesitate to e-mail me at jmetcalf@edgewoodclinicalservices.com.

 

Season’s blessings to you all as we close another year, and prepare for 2019.

Types of Counseling

Types of CounselingEvery day, countless people seek out counseling services to find help in some area of life. There are more mental health services than ever before, but with so much variety it is important to distinguish between the types of counseling services that are available in order to find the best fit for you. Maybe you have never tried counseling and have a few questions. Who goes to counseling? What types of issues are addressed in counseling sessions? Am I too old or too young for counseling?  Or perhaps you have been a long-time believer in counseling services and now you want to communicate the types of counseling to a friend of a loved one in need. Thankfully, there are numerous types of counseling services that are available to meet a wide range of needs.

Treating a Variety of People

Whether you are young or old, counseling is a worthwhile option to find support and healing. Counselors work with individuals, couples, or families depending on the needs of the client system. Individuals can work with counselors one-on-one to address issues across the lifespan, ranging from early childhood to late adulthood. Couples counseling is available for spouses to work together with a therapist to address relationship concerns in any stage of marriage. Entire families can be a part of the therapeutic experience through family counseling, where counselors work with the family unit to enhance cohesion, communication, and other related coping skills. You are not limited to a single type of counseling session during your therapeutic experience. Rather, you may find a combination of these approaches to be beneficial depending on your specific needs.

Addressing a Variety of Concerns

Therapists are trained to help clients identify personal, marital, or family issues. Our counselors work with a wide variety of concerns such as anxiety, depression, trauma, adjustment disorders, school refusal, anger management, and substance abuse, to name a few. Some common marital concerns addressed in counseling include communication, intimacy, financial, infertility, parenting, or life changes. No matter the concern, our therapists are committed to a non-judgmental and empathetic approach throughout your journey. Our therapists are dedicated to helping you face your challenges in a constructive way that will enable you to enjoy a more satisfying quality of life.

Considering Your Options

At Edgewood, our counselors are equipped to support you and teach you strategies for coping more effectively with the difficulties of life. Our therapists are trained in many types of therapy techniques to help with your specific needs. Some of these techniques include Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and Mindfulness. We have clinician profiles accessible online for you to explore the diverse specialties of our staff and to help you find the right fit for your needs.

If you or a loved one are in need of counseling services, please contact our caring staff at 630-428-7890 to explore the options available to you through Edgewood Clinical Services.  We are here to help you take the next steps in your healing journey.

When is Counseling Recommended?

When is counseling recommendedMaybe you have a hard time ever feeling motivated to get routine chores done. Maybe you’re crying all the time. Or maybe you’re feeling defeated and hopeless about ever finding that perfect someone to spend your life with. Maybe you have so many demands on your time, both at home and at work, that you think you can’t juggle any more.

Perhaps you think that’s just the way life is. That’s just the way you are. You think you just need more…something…(inspiration,energy, self-confidence?).

Have you ever considered that counseling might help? If you aren’t sure, here are some signs counseling would be recommended.

Feeling sad, angry, not yourself: When these feelings are uncontrollable, it’s time to get professional help. Some behavior that might accompany these are sleeping more or less than you usually do and avoiding family and friends. Counseling is important and can help you regain control and get your life back.

Abusing or overusing drugs, alcohol, or food: If you turn to substance or behavior as a coping mechanism, if you can’t control them, or if you can’t stop, you may need help to deal with it. A trained counselor can give you the tools you need to overcome the behavior you struggle with.

Loss of someone or something important: Maybe you lost someone you loved or you might be going through a breakup, a divorce, or a job loss. A counselor can help you through this intensely difficult time in your life and get you back on your feet.

You’ve had a traumatic experience: Abuse, neglect, trauma, being the victim of a crime, in an accident, or having a serious illness can all have a serious impact on your life. Sometimes it’s a  struggle to deal with it and that’s when a professional can help you, whether you just need someone to talk to, or you need to learn coping mechanisms.

You can’t do the things you enjoy: If you’ve been unable to get out and do things that before always brought joy to your life, or things you liked doing, it may signal that you are having problems, even if you can’t really describe it. Seeing a counselor can help you identify the problem and deal with it.

Nothing you’ve tried has helped: If you’ve tried things that have helped you cope with hard times in the past, but nothing has worked, seeking help may be what you need this time around.

Friends and family are disappearing on you: If your friends and family are usually there for you, to lend an ear or a shoulder, but now are in hiding and not answering phone calls or texts, it’s likely they have heard too much and are overwhelmed. A counselor can help you sort things out, and you will probably learn new ways to cope with hard times.

People have noticed: If people have noticed that you seem to be struggling and have brought it up to you, that’s a strong indicator that you need a professional to help you get through this time in your life.

Unexplained headaches, stomachaches or an immune system that’s run down: Being emotionally upset can physically affect your body. This is not an unusual response to intense stress. Sometimes just talking to someone neutral and safe helps put you back in charge.

Make an Appointment 

At Edgewood Clinical Services, we follow a distinctive approach to counseling and therapy. First and foremost, we are goal directed. Effective therapy is about more than just talking; it’s about seeing results. We work with you to set and achieve measurable, meaningful goals that will make a difference in your life.

Make an appointment today so we can start helping you through this time in your life.

Ask an Edge Expert: November 2018

Ready Player One to Snapchat

Featured Expert- Tony Rio, LCPC

I fondly remember being a child of the 80’s and the wonders that it brought. From bikes to trains to video games, we surely had it all. Or so we thought. Imagine what our formative years would have been like were we exposed to what children and teens have at their disposal these days. Electronic devices and video games are overwhelmingly more advanced than their now-ancient predecessors and social media is a concept that has only entered our lexicon within the last 15 years or so. Despite the monumental differences in platforms and tools, the overlapping things are entertainment and socialization. When taken down to their basic levels, children today are dealing with the same issues that their parents did many years prior.

As parents, you always try to stay current with what your children are into; but inevitably they may pass you up with their mastery of said interest. One can easily do a Google search for the dangers of video games or social media and I will be the first to echo some of those potential dangers. However, the more important search should be to explore your children’s interests and tools they are using. When clear expectations, communication, understanding and moderation are used with regards to video games & social media, it can help both sides experience less frustration and aggravation.

I freely admit here that I struggle to keep up with the advancements in video games, particularly the changing social aspect of playing games. To be that person, back in my day we had to be in the same room as your friend if you wanted to play together. The idea that I would be able to play with a friend down the block or in another state would have blown my 12 year old’s mind. That was inconceivable of a notion to me, yet here we are in a time where I can play a game with a friend on the other side of the world.

Acknowledging and owning my ignorance has helped me to accept that this is the world that our children live in. They don’t know what it is like to hope that your friend is in the same building as their land line so that you can arrange whose house you were going to play your new Nintendo game. It is different for parents, but not for the generation that has these tools at their disposal. Instead of fighting it, we need to embrace it as they have so clearly done. But with that should come a period of vetting the process. It is amazing how much a kid will talk about their favorite video game if given the chance. And yes, probably 95% of it goes right over your head; but that moment is not lost with your child in you taking an interest in their interests. Sit down and play a game of Fortnite or Call of Duty and embrace that you are a ‘noob’ (someone new to gaming as defined by Urban Dictionary). You won’t have a clue what you’re doing, but have fun learning and getting a glimpse into the lives of your kids. Having more understanding of what they do and how they do it helps decrease the amount of possible assumptions that are drawn. Talk with your children about the social components of video gaming just as you would teach them about any other form of social interaction they have in their lives. The skills are the same, only the vehicle for communication is different.

Okay, so by now you’re saying, “he hasn’t said anything about the violence in video games.” That is correct. Video games have definitely changed from long blocks hitting a single block, to a plumber jumping on turtles to images that look so real you almost cannot tell the difference. The overall premise of video games have not changed much over their existence. They have always been comprised of a character in some form trying not to die with the goal to destroy as many other characters as possible. While games have become considerably more immersive and realistic, they remain a story that one plays out. When children have become age-appropriate for video games, they have developed a good moral compass and the ability to separate fantasy from reality. This only increases with age and when they enter their teen years, their moral compass has expanded to a wider world-view. However, as parents, that vetting task is crucial here to ensure that your children have an understanding of the differences between their games and the real world.

Warning parents! This part is a plug from your children. There are also benefits to playing video games, believe it or not. Survey 10 children/teens what they like about playing video games and all 10 would most likely say, “they’re fun!”  Of course they’re fun, why wouldn’t they be a good time? Playing video games is a pleasurable activity for most and as a result, it releases dopamine in our brain. It is no different than when our brain releases dopamine from other pleasurable activities such as running, riding a bike, dancing or laughing. Research shows that the amount of dopamine released from playing video games is not significantly higher than any other pleasurable activity, generally about double our resting rate levels (drug use releases about 10 times the amount of dopamine). Playing video games can help improve such things as visual acuity, attention, spatial memory and executive functioning (which can positively impact improvement in critical thinking skills and the ability to make reasoned decisions). Video games also have become an important coping tool for many children and teenagers specifically. Most will report that it is a great outlet for them to manage their always-fluctuating moods. Although I’m sure it can be difficult for a parent to see their kid yelling at a video game and think that it’s helping their mood, but you might be surprised at the answer you get from them (but ask after they’re done playing though, not in that moment).

With all of this said, I return to the earlier notion on having clear expectations, communication, understanding and moderation with your children. At the onset of kids playing video games, it is crucial for the parents to establish what the norms, rules and expectations are for allotted video game time. If the precedent is set early that there is no consistency in the aforementioned tasks, it becomes difficult to undo it down the road. On the flipside, when things do change (and we know that things will change, as they usually do) we need to work with our children on re-defining the norms, rules and expectations. Helping them be flexible in making changes to their routines will help immensely with any adjustment period. Video game time can be a positive, but should be like everything else in life, consumed in moderation.

That brings us to social media. This is the modern-day passing a note to someone else, sharing today’s fad or trend, engaging in the rumor mill, belonging to cliques and everything else that has to do with one’s social life. The platforms and vehicles are new, but the behaviors are the same as their parents before them. If Snapchat or Instagram existed during your teenage years, you would probably use it, let’s be real. Your kid is on Snapchat, while you’re on Facebook both doing the same things in slightly different ways. Teens are equipped with so many tools to share their lives and stay up-to-date with whatever is happening in their friends’ lives, engaging in the same basic behaviors that their parents did and their parents before them did. The behaviors are the same, just the tools have changed.

Unfortunately, as the tools have advanced and become prolific, it brings with it more potential exposure to negativity. Just as with video games, working with your children on balance & moderation, while exploring the differences in the online world vs. the real world is what needs to take place. Be involved in how & why your children prefer the social media platforms they use, but not over-involved to the point where you have to sneak peeks into their Snapchat account. Have open dialogue with your children about social media like video games so that they know they can talk to you about the good and the bad about it; because they will experience both, as social media is merely a reflection on life, good and bad.

Recent News

Our Local Schools

Our Local Schools

We have a formal business partnership with Naperville CUSD 203 and professional relationships with Indian Prairie School District 204 and Plainfield School District 202.

Naperville Chamber of Commerce

Naperville Chamber of Commerce

Adam Russo, Edgewood’s Chairman & CEO, will Chair the Chamber Board of Directors in 2016, and is paneled with the Chamber’s Speakers Bureau.

Advanced Health of Naperville and the Naperville Moms Network

Our relationship with respected Chiropractor Dr. Cathy Subber of Advanced Health Naperville provides us with a great referral for families who are looking for an alternative to medications. The Naperville Moms Network provides a place for local moms to go to meet other moms with similar interests and who may have a difficult time forming a social network.

ATI Physical Therapy Women Serving Women & Premier Care for Women

ATI Physical Therapy Women Serving Women & Premier Care For Women

Partnering to create a unique focus on women’s wellness with the understanding that a healthy woman will share her wellness with her children, husband and her community.